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Friday, May 17, 2019

Pete sent me his SBE-34



Pete is such a great guy, and such a great ham.  Earlier this week I came home to find a box in the living room.  In it was the SBE-34 that you see in the video.  Pete had been talking about this rig about 18 months ago.  

So many cool features:  The main tuning dial is dual-speed.  There is the "Geneva" band switching method.  Hybrid, with sweep tubes in the final.  All analog.  A power supply that will take 110V AC or 12V DC (internal inverter).   Collins mechanical filter at 455 kc.   Bilateral amplifier stages.  PNP Germanium transistors. 

Pete suggested that I might want to use this rig for parts.  No way!  There is real radio history and amazing innovation in this rig. Plus, it has been worked on by Pete Juliano, N6QW.  

Here is the write up from Pete's YouTube page. Note the part about how they get the BFO signal. 

Here is an example of what an IC7300 might look like some 50 years ago. It is a hybrid rig using Germanium (mostly PNP) transistors in the low level stages. So OK a couple of NPN (2N706) in several key locations such as the VFO. The driver uses a tube similar to a 12BY7 and the finals are a pair of sweep tubes, the 6GB5's. The rig operated on four bands (mostly the then phone portions) 80, 40, 20 and 15 Meters. The power out on 80-20 was 60 Watts PEP and dropped down to 50 Watts on 15 Meters. That was a real stretch. The AGC sucked as you will see in the movie and the receiver gain was a compromise --too much on the low bands and weak on the higher. This was a bilateral design -- which predates the Bitx series by some 40 years--but not the 1st.The first bilateral design was the Cosmophone - Google that one. The major selling point --a Collins mechanical filter. Also an innovation was how LSB / USB was achieved using a single crystal. It was pure magic and innovation. The basic BFO frequency of 456.38 was doubled and then doubled and tripled again. The first 2X gave you 912.76 KHz and the 2nd 2X gave you1825.52 KHz and a tripling gave you 2738.28 KHz. Mixing that back with 456.38KHz gave you 2281.9 KHz USB or LSB. The VFO operated in the 5.5 MHz range and there were heterodyne crystals to put you on the proper bands. Now that was some clever math! You can download the maintenance manual at BAMA manuals. There were some smart guys leading our ham radio efforts back in the day.

3 comments:

  1. The usb/lsb selection scheme was in an eary famous ssb artice in QST, reprinted in one of the ssb handbooks, i've seen it used elsewhere, neat for some things, but you need the crystal and flexibility of choosing frequencies.

    About 1968, CQ rana long artice by W2EEY about mods to the rig,tresting it as low end with room for improvement, covering some of what you mention.

    Someone built their own,though I don't know how direct a copy. Not sure of qst date, but it's in a later ssb manuall.

    Michael

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  2. You know Pete is just being nice, giving away his Superhet junk, its all analog anyway...

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  3. I'm constantly asked at hamfests if I ever heard of of SBE...

    73,

    -- Dave, N8SBE (the SBE suffix was 'luck of the draw' when I got my Novice license in 1970 as WN4SBE)

    ReplyDelete

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